(Fun fact: St. Patrick used the shamrock in his teachings to illustrate the Christian concept of the Trinity.)







Directed by Ryan Mattos, Bernard Derriman, Tony Gennaro.



[] People want to know about these six Irish women from a thousand … […]when i was a kid in brooklyn, new york,1945 and 46, i had a wonderful teacher in the first and second grades, miss donellen, who was not exactly a young lady when she taught me to read and write.



The English are fond of these language stereotypes – not just the ‘Oirishisms’ you mention, but expressions like ‘hoots mon’ and ‘och aye the noo’ (supposed to be used by Scottish people) or ‘bonzer’ and ‘fair dinkum’ (supposedly typical of Australians).










You make a good point about the spirit in which it’s offered.







(Fun fact: St. Patrick used the shamrock in his teachings to illustrate the Christian concept of the Trinity.)





Usually spoken as the speaker opens a bottle of Killian's.







(Fun fact: St. Patrick used the shamrock in his teachings to illustrate the Christian concept of the Trinity.)

While I can’t put a date on when “TotM” started to recede, a rough guess might put its … However, I quite like this Four-Leaf Clover Print by Banquet Atelier & Workshop.



It’s interesting how “Top of the morning…” is so well known as a greeting despite not being very common in actual use.



[…] to small talk, with an Irish flavour: in “Top of the morning to yourself” I examine a well-known Irish greeting that no one in Ireland seems to use anymore except in jest […]I never knew what the response to “top o’ the mornin’ to ya” was until I read it here! House of Pain was an Irish-styled American





He tweets at @StanCarey.And top of the morning to yourself, Stan.


Loading player…

Or does modern language have its own colour that we can’t see, but will be lost, and mourned by the future generations.Passer: Those are good questions.

If there’s a particular expression someone wants to see survive, they can keep using it.Marc: Very interesting, thank you.

The original phrase is so rarely used as an authentic greeting that the response seems to have faded into obscurity. I would have no objections to having it addressed to me sincerely, or even jokingly; it’s the dancing leprechaun – complete with ludicrous accent and something to sell – that makes me cringe.i’ve always enjoyed the variations of different languages and the irish is one of my favorites. House of Pain was an Irish-styled American 1







It’s St. Patrick’s Day, so by all accounts, I should be posting about shamrocks, or three-leaf clover.

The “herself” and “himself” were used regularly by my parents – my mother using it with customers to refer to my father (who was a small businessman) as in “you’d better talk to himself” and my father used it with commercial salesmen in relation to my mother as in “you’d better talk to herself” – in other words, abdicating responsibility!I didn’t know the standard response either, Helen, until I looked into it.

















I don’t know its origin, but I imagine it comes from farming territory – a regional variation, as you say.I`m Irish born,living in Australia and I can assure you ,fair dinkum IS used very oftenMy grandmother, born in the 1890’s in Newfoundland, was a 3rd generation Newfoundlander. Scrobbling is when Last.fm tracks the music you listen to and automatically adds it to your music profile. When I started classes in college with a native German professor, she was amused that I spoke with an Austrian accent!Katie: I’ve sometimes wondered what constitutes an Austrian accent, because apparently I have one too!



‘Tis yourself dat’ll sound like an […][…] Top o’ the mornin’ to ya, design lovers!

I suppose part of why we stereotype each other so reliably is our tendency to categorise: as kids we learn to label everything and put it in assorted boxes.

6



“Top of the morning to you”, or more casually “Top o’ the mornin’ to ya”, is a well-known traditional Irish greeting that Irish people don’t really use any more – at least not without irony, in my experience. 2











[] The very title stirs the imagination.





It’s St. Patrick’s Day, so by all accounts, I should be posting about shamrocks, or three-leaf clover.